Types of Sinks

The Ultimate Guide to different Types of Sinks

Kitchen Sink | Bathroom Sink

Choosing a sink, regardless if it is for a kitchen or a bathroom, is a vital part of any home remodeling project. Sinks greatly impact how the room looks and functions. Thus you will want to make sure you pick the right type that suits your home’s needs. There are a lot of choices to be made such as what the sink will be made out of, how big does it need to be and what features will you need to keep you home running smoothly. This article will act as a guide. We will go over the different types of sinks, as well as their pros and cons so that you can make the best decision for your next kitchen or bathroom remodel.

Sink Types

By Basins & Sink Material

Knowing what you need is always the first step in picking any appliance. For sinks you’ll need to decide between a double basin or a single basin.

Double Basins

A popular choice of kitchen sink for its convenience and functionality. Having two basins allows for one side to be for rinsing and the other side for drying, just as an example. One of the few downsides is that sometimes either side can be too small to hold larger things, i.e. baking pans, but if you can find a sink with a low divider then that is no longer a problem (dividers also prevent overflow). You can also install a double basin in a corner which will cleverly make use of the counter-corner space.

Single Basin

A classic style for bathrooms and kitchens alike. They can be large to accommodate large cooking pans or small just enough to wash your hands. There are a variety of styles so you can really go all in on the aesthetics. Single basins allow for styles such as integrated sinks (when it blends seamlessly with the countertop), vessel sinks (sink base that sits on top of a countertop) and pedestal sinks (a stand-alone sink with no countertop). All three of these styles we will discuss more about below.

Double Basins

A popular choice of kitchen sink for its convenience and functionality. Having two basins allows for one side to be for rinsing and the other side for drying, just as an example. One of the few downsides is that sometimes either side can be too small to hold larger things, i.e. baking pans, but if you can find a sink with a low divider then that is no longer a problem (dividers also prevent overflow). You can also install a double basin in a corner which will cleverly make use of the counter-corner space.

Single Basin

A classic style for bathrooms and kitchens alike. They can be large to accommodate large cooking pans or small just enough to wash your hands. There are a variety of styles so you can really go all in on the aesthetics. Single basins allow for styles such as integrated sinks (when it blends seamlessly with the countertop), vessel sinks (sink base that sits on top of a countertop) and pedestal sinks (a stand-alone sink with no countertop). All three of these styles we will discuss more about below.

Sinks can be made out of almost anything! In fact, many sinks are made out of the same kinds of materials as countertops. Moreover, a common feature in bathrooms, you can have the sink seamlessly blend with your countertops (called an integrated sink). These style often look great but come with the downside of being harder to repair or replace. Other common sink materials include…

Types of Sinks

By Sink Design Style

Bar or Prep Sinks

Typically smaller than the average sink, its perfect for a home bar or as a secondary sink in the kitchen.

Pros: The best part about these sinks are that they don't take up much room but can greatly increase the versatility and efficiency of your kitchen.

Cons: They tend to be small and shallow. Bar sinks are also an added expense.

Console Sinks

A mix between a wall-mounted sink and a pedestal sink - the console sink is often both mounted to the wall and supported by two or more legs.

Pros: Stylish and can be  handicap-accessible if designed properly, the console sink is great for if you need to save on space.

Cons: The plumbing may be exposed and thus will require extra effort to make it look attractive.

Corner Sink

A double basin set up that will work perfectly in the corner of your kitchen.

Pros: Makes use of the the often wasted space - the counter corner!

Cons: Is an uncommon sink, thus is hard to find and fairly expensive.

Drainboard Sinks

Drainboard sinks are the combination of a basin on one side and a counter-level drainboard on the other, making it a nice double-function set up.

Pros: Is a great fit for galley or smaller kitchen set ups.

Cons: The basin itself tends to be small and drainboard is pointless if you don't often hand-wash dishes.

Farmhouse Sinks

Also known as an apron sink, farmhouse sinks are defined by a large single basin and are installed on top of cabinet or table rather than countertops.

Pros: Perfectly sized to handle casserole dishes or baking pans.

Cons: Is prone to dripping since there is only a narrow barrier between the sink and floor.

Island Sinks

If you have a kitchen island, then you might also consider getting a kitchen island sink!

Pros: Provides a good set up for entertaining or for households with kids because you can still use the sink while still being able to see guests or children.

Cons: If you wanted to use the kitchen island for dining or a place to gather than having a sink with dishes may not be a pleasant set up for your lifestyle.

Over Mount Sinks

Over-mount, top-mount, self-rimming and drop-in are all names for the most common kitchen sink type. The countertop is cut and the sink is inserted on top then calked with silicone.

Pros: It has a very affordable sink installation.

Cons: The rim itself adds another step to cleaning.

Pedestal Sinks

A classic bathroom sink style; it makes the sink a stand-alone feature. Note, you will need a professional to install it.

Pros: It is perfect for bathrooms that don't have a lot of room to spare.

Cons: The biggest pitfall of a pedestal sink is that it doesn't provide storage or much surface for use.

Trough Sinks

An underrated but becoming ever trendier sink type that fits two faucets in one long basin. A great set up for a master bathroom that wants all the function with less wasted space.

Pros: Has a versatile look which can lean into any aesthetic from industrial to rustic, classy to natural and everything in between.

Cons: This style of sink takes up quite a bit of counter space, giving you less room to work with when getting ready in the morning.

Under Mount Sinks

The opposite to the top-mount sink, under-mount sinks are attached to the bottom of the counter.

Pros: No rim to clean and are often higher quality than over-mount types.

Cons: Comes with size limits and will need the under-side cleaned.

Vessel Sinks

A trendy style for bathroom sink fixtures, this style forms a bowl over the counter top rather than be built in or under them.

Pros: These stylish sinks are easy to install and save on counter space.

Cons: Cleaning can be a bit more extensive than other sink types and vessel sinks are at more risk of being damaged.

Wall-Mounted Sinks

Also known as the floating sink, this style is versatile as it can be a stand-alone sink or combined with a floating cabinet for more storage space.

Pros: The ultimate bathroom sink choice if you want to create space and if you like the industrial look then the exposed plumbing fits perfectly with that aesthetic.

Cons: Installation is difficult since you need not only strong walls but also specific brackets to properly and safely make your sink float.

Bar or Prep Sinks

Typically smaller than the average sink, its perfect for a home bar or as a secondary sink in the kitchen.

Pros: The best part about these sinks are that they don't take up much room but can greatly increase the versatility and efficiency of your kitchen.

Cons: They tend to be small and shallow. Bar sinks are also an added expense.

Console Sinks

A mix between a wall-mounted sink and a pedestal sink - the console sink is often both mounted to the wall and supported by two or more legs.

Pros: Stylish and can be  handicap-accessible if designed properly, the console sink is great for if you need to save on space.

Cons: The plumbing may be exposed and thus will require extra effort to make it look attractive.

Corner Sink

A double basin set up that will work perfectly in the corner of your kitchen.

Pros: Makes use of the the often wasted space - the counter corner!

Cons: Is an uncommon sink, thus is hard to find and fairly expensive.

Drainboard Sinks

Drainboard sinks are the combination of a basin on one side and a counter-level drainboard on the other, making it a nice double-function set up.

Pros: Is a great fit for galley or smaller kitchen set ups.

Cons: The basin itself tends to be small and drainboard is pointless if you don't often hand-wash dishes.

Farmhouse Sinks

Also known as an apron sink, farmhouse sinks are defined by a large single basin and are installed on top of cabinet or table rather than countertops.

Pros: Perfectly sized to handle casserole dishes or baking pans.

Cons: Is prone to dripping since there is only a narrow barrier between the sink and floor.

Island Sinks

If you have a kitchen island, then you might also consider getting a kitchen island sink!

Pros: Provides a good set up for entertaining or for households with kids because you can still use the sink while still being able to see guests or children.

Cons: If you wanted to use the kitchen island for dining or a place to gather than having a sink with dishes may not be a pleasant set up for your lifestyle.

Over Mount Sinks

Over-mount, top-mount, self-rimming and drop-in are all names for the most common kitchen sink type. The countertop is cut and the sink is inserted on top then calked with silicone.

Pros: It has a very affordable sink installation.

Cons: The rim itself adds another step to cleaning.

Pedestal Sinks

A classic bathroom sink style; it makes the sink a stand-alone feature. Note, you will need a professional to install it.

Pros: It is perfect for bathrooms that don't have a lot of room to spare.

Cons: The biggest pitfall of a pedestal sink is that it doesn't provide storage or much surface for use.

Trough Sinks

An underrated but becoming ever trendier sink type that fits two faucets in one long basin. A great set up for a master bathroom that wants all the function with less wasted space.

Pros: Has a versatile look which can lean into any aesthetic from industrial to rustic, classy to natural and everything in between.

Cons: This style of sink takes up quite a bit of counter space, giving you less room to work with when getting ready in the morning.

Under Mount Sinks

The opposite to the top-mount sink, under-mount sinks are attached to the bottom of the counter.

Pros: No rim to clean and are often higher quality than over-mount types.

Cons: Comes with size limits and will need the under-side cleaned.

Vessel Sinks

A trendy style for bathroom sink fixtures, this style forms a bowl over the counter top rather than be built in or under them.

Pros: These stylish sinks are easy to install and save on counter space.

Cons: Cleaning can be a bit more extensive than other sink types and vessel sinks are at more risk of being damaged.

Wall-Mounted Sinks

Also known as the floating sink, this style is versatile as it can be a stand-alone sink or combined with a floating cabinet for more storage space.

Pros: The ultimate bathroom sink choice if you want to create space and if you like the industrial look then the exposed plumbing fits perfectly with that aesthetic.

Cons: Installation is difficult since you need not only strong walls but also specific brackets to properly and safely make your sink float.

Ready to Change your Bathroom or Kitchen sink?

Sinks are a key part of any bathroom or sink, so you’ll want to make sure you pick the perfect one that fits your home’s lifestyle! We do hope this guide has helped but if you need more help with your next kitchen or bathroom remodel then be sure to call Yardley Kitchen Bath! We can help you design the home of your dreams. Consultations are free!

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